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Should We Retain Kids to Raise Reading Achievement?


• Cari Miller

Many states are adopting “reading by grade 3” policies to improve student reading achievement in the early grades. Some of these policies include retention for students who are unable to read at the end of third grade, giving them an additional year with intense reading services to help them catch up with their peers.

Timothy Shanahan, a Professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Director of the Center for Literacy, responds to the following question “Should We Retain Kids to Raise Reading Achievement?” Professor Shanahan highlights Florida’s literacy-based promotion policy as one of the key reasons why states are adopting “reading by grade 3” policies. The research on Florida’s literacy-based promotion policy suggests it’s working and this research is giving Professor Shanahan pause on whether retention can raise student reading achievement. Take a look and stay tuned as this is only Part I of Timothy Shanahan’s blog.

Should We Retain Kids to Raise Reading Achievement? Part I 

 


About the author


Cari Miller

Cari@excelined.org

Cari Miller serves as Policy Director of Early Literacy for ExcelinEd. She works hand in hand with states pursuing a comprehensive approach to K-3 reading policy, and she supports state departments with effective policy implementation. Cari is a former elementary teacher and reading coach. She also served as the Deputy Director of Just Read, Florida!, Governor Jeb Bush’s statewide literacy initiative. At Just Read, Florida!, she served in other capacities, including: Elementary Reading Specialist, Director of Reading First and Director of Elementary Reading. Her sole mission is to improve student reading achievement across the nation.